JUNETEENTH

JUNETEENTH

FRIDAY, JUNE 19, 2020

H.B.C.U. DAY

 [HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES]

 THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES

 

TO RALLY SUPPORT FOR

H.B.C.U.’S THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES

SEND A STRONG MESSAGE REFLECTING THE

GREAT CONTRIBUTIONS RENDERED

& DEMAND JUSTICE & EQUALITY!

 

SUPPORT LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

 BLACK BUSINESSES

BECOME FINANCIALLY AND PHYSICALLY ACTIVE

 WITH AN H.B.C.U.

 

ON THIS DAY

DO NOT SUPPORT

 THE LOTTERY, OFF TRACK BETTING, SLOTS, GAMBLING, SPORTS BETTING, GAMING, ETC.

 

Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Cel-Liberation Day, or the Black Fourth of July, is an American holiday that commemorates June 19, 1865. On this day, after almost two and a half years since the implementation of the Emancipation Proclamation, enslaved African Americans were informed of their liberation from the slavery present in the former Confederate States of America.

 

MD HBCU’S MATTER COALITION - https://www.mhcdc.net/hbcus

 443/255-6056 – 410/669-VOTE – CIVILRIGHTS@VERIZON.NET

UPDATE: Maryland HBCU Advocates Respond to Gov. Hogan's Veto of HB1260 and SB1043

MEDIA ADVISORY

MD HBCU Advocates Respond to Hogan Veto of Funding Bill for Black Universities

 

For more information:                                                       

Sharon Blake

410-868-5117

Anthony McCarthy

443-488-2043

 

"It is most unfortunate that the state still refuses to acknowledge the order from Federal Judge Catherine Blake to fund unique, high demand academic programs, recruiting, and scholarships in response to the HBCU Coalition representing the extraordinary students, faculty, and alumni of the four Maryland HBCUs, and accept full responsibility for the circumstances underlying that order.

Unlike the Kirwan bill, the HBCU funding bill is an attempt to settle a 14-year long lawsuit in which the State of Maryland has been found liable for un-Constitutional, racist, and discriminatory practices that created and sustained a separate and unequal higher education system.

By this veto, the governor refuses to resolve this long-standing case, endorses, and continues the hostile position which caused it to be filed. And although we are in the midst of a health and economic crisis, we cannot lose sight of the crisis that the four Maryland HBCUs have been forced to endure for generations.

The unanimous vote in the Senate and near-unanimous vote in the House of Delegates during the 2020 legislative session represents the clear will of the people of Maryland to end the unconstitutional dual-system of higher education and to ensure equal educational opportunities for all Marylanders.

The time is now for one higher education system to serve one richly diverse Maryland. The Maryland HBCU Advocates will continue to support the work of the Coalition as it seeks to end the duplication of programs that have resulted in a separate and unequal higher education system in Maryland.

The Maryland HBCU Advocates will continue to pursue all avenues to successfully address a remedy to this longstanding lawsuit and to ensure the continued viability of all four Maryland HBCUs."

 

Sharon Y. Blake, spokesperson

Maryland HBCU Advocates

https://www.savemdhbcus.org/

# # #

 

 

 

 

Maryland HBCU Advocates

MDHBCUAdvocates@gmail.com

(410) 934-7471

www.savemdhbcus.org

Facebook: savemdhbcus

Twitter: @savemdhbcus



#SaveMDHBCUs | #FinishTheFight

#TellThemWeAreRising

 

HOGAN VETOES FUNDING FOR HBCU's

SUNDAY, MAY 10TH, 2020  BALTIMORE BREW
EDUCATION BY IAN ROUND6:57 PM MAY 7, 2020

Hogan vetoes funding for Maryland schools and HBCUs

Governor cites the coronavirus pandemic as the reason for his vetoes

Above: Gov. Larry Hogan addresses the General Assembly in 2017. (Capital News Service)

After saying he wouldn’t increase spending during the economic downturn accompanying the coronavirus, Gov. Larry Hogan today vetoed two bills aimed at educational equity.

Most notably, he vetoed HB1300, the landmark legislation which would have funded the recommendations of the Kirwan Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education.

Among those recommendations were expanded prekindergarten instruction, higher teacher pay, improved college-prep, and greater state support for schools with concentrations of children from low-income families.

The governor also vetoed HB1260, which gives the state’s four historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) about $580 million by 2031. Two of those schools, Morgan State University and Coppin State University, are located in Baltimore.

The vetoed HBCU bill would help settle a bitter 2006 federal lawsuit in which the state was accused of undermining black colleges and universities by creating duplicate academic programs at traditionally white schools. Last fall, Hogan made a “final offer” of $200 million to settle the lawsuit, which was far less than the coalition demanded.

Hogan cited the “economic turmoil” arising from the coronavirus as the reason for vetoing the Kirwan and HBCU legislation.

“The economic fallout from this pandemic simply makes it impossible to fund any new programs, impose any new tax hikes, nor adopt any legislation having any significant fiscal impact, regardless of the merits of the legislation,” he wrote in a letter to Maryland Senate President Bill Ferguson (D-Baltimore City) and House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne Jones (D-Baltimore County).

Kirwan: “Shortsighted”

Education advocates across the state, including William “Brit” Kirwan, chair and namesake of the commission, denounced Hogan’s veto of the school funding bill.

Many noted that the bill allocates only $37 million to Maryland’s public schools in the next fiscal year, then ramps up spending to an estimated total of $4 billion by FY2025.

Kirwan said he was disappointed by Hogan’s “shortsighted” and “unfortunate” decision. He pointed to a mechanism in the bill that caps spending during economic downturns and could have been applied to the present moment.

“The legislature had the foresight to suspend funding for it during the kind of fiscal downturn we are experiencing at the moment,” he stated.

“If anything, the disparate impact of Covid-19 on low-income and minority communities only reinforces the need and moral imperative for the provisions in the bill,” added Kirwan, who served as chancellor of the University System of Maryland from 2002 to 2015.

Legislative Override

Others who spoke out today wanted to do more than bemoan Hogan’s veto – they wanted to fight it.

Multiple stakeholders in Kirwan bill demanded an override of the Republican governor’s veto, which the Democratic majority in the General Assembly could attempt, either at a special session this year or at the next regular session in January.

Other statements on the Kirwan veto:

• Maryland State Education Association President Cheryl Bolt: “Our schools have been underfunded for years and recent weeks have only magnified the existing inequities that our students face every day that challenge their ability to succeed in school.”

• ACLU of Maryland: “Gov. Larry Hogan’s veto means that tens of thousands of children will continue to attend substandard schools that do not meet the state’s constitutional guarantee of a ‘thorough and efficient’ education.”

• Joe Francaviglia, executive director of Strong Schools Maryland: “Politics is not a good enough reason to deny kids of desperately needed resources and future opportunities.”

• Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott: “The children of Baltimore, tomorrow’s future leaders, were depending on this once-in-a-generation opportunity to have schools that are equitably funded and be trained for the jobs of tomorrow.”

• Maryland Senate President Bill Ferguson: “The governor had a choice today to reject traditional politics and work together to adjust shared visions and build a strong future after this crisis. Instead, he chose to foreclose hope, leaving Maryland families and historically black colleges and universities with an open question for the future.”

• Senator Paul Pinsky (D-Prince George’s): “Gov. Hogan shifted from crisis management to broad governing. Where he succeeded in the former, he’s failed miserably in the latter. He vetoed: Kirwan, failing our children; support for historic black colleges; and a pesticide ban that harms children. No vision, no belief system.”

HBCU'S ARE IMPERATIVE

Maryland General Assembly Passes HBCU Bill

LEGISLATION DETAILS HB 1260

Maryland HB1260 Historically Black Colleges and Universities - Funding

HOUSE BILL 1260- Historically Black Colleges and Universities Funding

Maryland speaker’s legislation would force settlement of long-running HBCU lawsuit


By Pamela Wood

Baltimore Sun |
Feb 07, 2020 | 10:30 AM

House Speaker Adrienne A. Jones is hoping to force the state to settle a long-running lawsuit that alleges it made decisions that harmed the viability of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities, including Coppin State University in Baltimore, shown in this 2007 photo.

 

Maryland House of Delegates Speaker Adrienne A. Jones is hoping to force the state to settle a long-running lawsuit that alleges it made decisions that harmed the viability of historically black colleges and universities.

A federal court has already ruled against the state in parts of the lawsuit, which four state universities filed in 2006.

Both sides have participated in court-ordered settlement discussions, but have not reached an agreement.

Jones is introducing a bill in the House that would require the governor to spend $580 million over the next 10 years at the four colleges on initiatives including creating academic programs, expanding scholarships and financial aid, recruiting faculty, providing more academic supports to students and marketing the schools to potential students.

The spending proposed in Jones’ legislation is in line with a request for a $577 million settlement from a coalition representing Bowie State University, Coppin State University and Morgan State University in Baltimore, and the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore.

Gov. Larry Hogan, meanwhile, has held firm that he will not increase the state’s “final offer” last fall of $200 million, an increase over an earlier $100 million offer.

“No one is more committed to resolving this issue than Governor Hogan, who has funded HBCUs at record levels and dramatically increased the state’s offer to settle this 13-year-long lawsuit,” Mike Ricci, a spokesman for the Republican governor, said in a statement.

One of the key issues of contention in the lawsuit is that the state allowed predominantly white institutions to have academic programs that duplicated those at the historically black colleges, perpetuating segregation among the state’s universities.

“The issue of program duplication has lingered for far too long and is a blemish on our state’s strong system of higher education,” Jones said Thursday in a statement. “I am pleased to have a solution to move forward and offer every student the support for the bright future they deserve.”

Michael D. Jones, an attorney representing the universities, said he’s pleased lawmakers are trying to resolve the lawsuit.

“I think this is an excellent development. I applaud her leadership,” Jones said of the Democratic speaker.

The attorney said the governor has been “shortsighted” not to settle the lawsuit and fund improvements at the colleges.

“I think the legislature is taking a longer view of this and recognizing that ultimately, it will be good for the state,” he said.

Del. Darryl Barnes, chairman of the Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland, said his group supports Jones’ legislation.

“We have the opportunity to set a precedent for other states to follow as we make history in the state of Maryland,” Barnes, a Prince George’s Democrat, said in a statement.

 

U.S. SENATE PASSES BILL TO PERMANENTLY FUND HBCUs

IF THE U.S. SENATE CAN DO THIS WHAT'S THE PROBLEM WITH THE MARYLAND GENERAL ASSEMBLY?

Senate passes bill to permanently fund historically black colleges and universities

(CLICK LINK ABOVE FOR FULL ARTICLE)