Mayor Pugh Selects New Orleans Police Superintendent Michael S. Harrison to Lead Baltimore Police Department

Mayor Pugh Selects New Orleans Police Superintendent Michael S. Harrison to Lead Baltimore Police Department


Catherine E. Pugh
Mayor,
City of Baltimore
250 City Hall • Baltimore, Maryland 21202 • 410-396-3835


January 8, 2019
Press Secretary
James E. Bentley II

PRESS RELEASE
Mayor Pugh Selects New Orleans Police Superintendent Michael S. Harrison to Lead Baltimore Police Department

BALTIMORE, MD. — Mayor Catherine Pugh has selected New Orleans Police Superintendent Michael S. Harrison as her choice for Commissioner-designate of the Baltimore Police Department.


Superintendent Harrison (49) has informed New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell of his decision to formally retire from the New Orleans Police Department which he has served for 27 years and led since 2014. Mayor Cantrell expressed her deep gratitude to Superintendent Harrison for his many years of dedicated service and strong leadership of the department, which has led to meaningful reform and reduced crime in the City of New Orleans. She wished him well on behalf of the citizens of her city.


Mayor Catherine E. Pugh stated: “I have informed City Council President Jack Young of my decision to submit to Council members the selection of New Orleans Police Superintendent Michael S. Harrison as the next Commissioner of the Baltimore Police Department. Superintendent Harrison has achieved clear, compelling and consistent results in reducing violent crime, implementing a federally-mandated consent decree, increasing police recruitment, introducing advanced technologies, and deploying proactive and effective policing strategies that reflect 21st century, constitutional policing. He will bring not only significant and relevant experience to addressing the challenges of Baltimore, but the insight and sensitivity needed to reestablish essential trust and confidence of citizens in their police officers.”


Commissioner-designate Harrison will participate in a number of meetings with community leaders, neighborhood associations and citizens prior to the formal submission of his nomination to the City Council. The timing and locations of those meetings, and eventual City Council hearings, have yet to be determined.


“I’m honored by Mayor Pugh’s confidence in my abilities and approach and look forward to getting to Baltimore in the coming weeks to engage broadly with residents about the challenges to public safety and confidence in their police department,” said Commissioner-designate Harrison. “My first priority will be to drive meaningful cultural change within the Department such that not only is there a renewed sense of purpose and mission among those sworn to protect and serve, but that citizens’ trust is restored to a new level that enables true collaboration and confidence. Only then can we make sustained progress in reducing violence in close partnership with those who have the most at stake. I am inspired by the approaches Mayor Pugh has introduced to address the root causes of violent crime and disrupt the lure of criminal life among those young people most at risk. I look forward to partnering with her, the men and women of the Baltimore Police Department, and the community to build on the clear momentum underway.”


Superintendent Harrison first joined the New Orleans Police Department as a patrol officer in 1991 and was later appointed Detective, Major Case Narcotics Section in 1995. He was appointed Sergeant in 1999, responsible for the Eighth District, and later as Sergeant of the Public Integrity Bureau in 2000 where he participated in covert investigations into criminal and administrative allegations involving members of the New Orleans Police Department. He was appointed Lieutenant of the Public Integrity Bureau in 2006. In early January 2009, he was appointed Lieutenant, Assistant District Commander of the Seventh District, and in 2010 he returned to the Public Integrity Bureau. Harrison was appointed Commander, Special Investigations Division in early 2011 as principal manager of all administrative functions of narcotics, vice, organized and unorganized gang enforcement units within the Department. In 2012, he was appointed Commander of the Seventh District, and two years later, assumed the responsibilities of Superintendent of the New Orleans Police Department.


Details of the community engagement and City Council approval process concerning Commissioner-designate Harrison’s nomination will be communicated at the earliest opportunity.
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SUPERINTENDENT MICHAEL S. HARRISON

NOPD WORK EXPERIENCE:

27 years of experience serving and protecting the citizens of New Orleans as a member of the New Orleans Police Department.

SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE AUGUST 2014 – CURRENT
In 2017, through the deployment of proactive policing strategies, the City saw a 10% reduction in the number of murders and a 20% reduction in the number of armed robberies. This was in addition to a 9% reduction in armed robberies that the City saw in 2016. Reduced violent crime in 2017 was achieved in large part due to successful coordination of effort in the summer with State Police, Probation and Parole, US Marshalls, FBI, and NOPD. Reduction in armed robberies was also due to the efforts of the Tactical Intelligence Gathering and Enforcement Response (TIGER) Task Forces that were created in 2016. TIGER task forces focus on individuals who have committed multiple offenses of armed robberies and shootings rather than targeting specific geographic areas of the City. In 2018, the City has seen a continuation of these crime reduction trends with a 7% reduction in murders, a 28% reduction in non-fatal shootings, a 33% reduction in actual persons being injured in shootings, a 10% reduction in armed robberies, and a 19% reduction in residence burglaries.


Successfully reversed the negative trends in police recruitment that existed prior to 2014; including, holding 16 academy classes between 2014 and 2018, which have added nearly 400 new officers to the force. More recently, the class that began in December 2017 had 40 recruits, which was the largest class since 2009. Recruitment processes have been completely overhauled, and resources dedicated to recruit more officers have expanded, including a successful multi-year partnership with the New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation that has resulted in over 7,500 online applications received to be a police recruit in 2017, a more than 60% increase over the prior year.


Presented and received approval for an aggressive series of police pay plan amendments to bring pay levels in line with the Southern Regional Average. The first raise was in 2015, which was a 15% across-the-board raise for officers; then in 2017, which was a targeted retention-based pay plan that addressed long standing issues related to pay compression and progression through the ranks. Success for this effort was verified when attrition of officers in 2017 was reduced by 25%, making it the lowest level observed in 20 years. In 2018, the department added a net gain of 30 additional officers to the force, with a second year of record low attrition levels for the department.


Developed a strategy for long-term continuity of operations and succession planning for NOPD by providing career development opportunities for the future leadership of NOPD, including; sending 12 Commanders to the Senior Management Institute for Police, 2 Lieutenants to the School of Police Staff and Command, 1 Deputy Chief to the Police Executive Leadership Institute, and 1 Commander to the ten-week FBI Training Academy. All of these training
opportunities were funded by successfully obtaining philanthropic support rather than having to rely on city funding sources.


Commissioned an independent & comprehensive review of NOPD operations upon entering the role of Superintendent. The review encompassed staffing, deployment, and organizational management and was completed by Berkshire Advisors in 2015. The report findings resulted in identifying nearly 100 positions whose duties could be performed by civilians, but were being filled by commissioned officers. Using these findings, ordered the redeployment of these officers to the field, and backfilling of positions with civilian personnel, which resulted in a greater than 50% reduction in response times for emergency calls for service in 2016.


Implemented comprehensive management reform of the Special Victims Section that was the subject of two negative Inspector General’s reports published in late 2014. In June 2016, the OIG was quoted as saying there was a “remarkable turnaround” in how the unit operates, reports, and manages evidence related to sex crimes. Established a series of best practices for management of the Special Victims Section to ensure progress does not backslide, and increased staffing resources to include civilian social workers, civilian investigators, and a new partnership with the Family Justice Center to provide a holistic approach to handling Special Victims cases.


In a survey conducted by the New Orleans Consent Decree Monitors in late 2016, 79% of NOPD officers stated they agree with the current direction of the department, up from only 19% under the previous Superintendent. In the 2018 New Orleans Crime Coalition survey, 83% of citizens stated they feel safe in their own neighborhoods. Overall, both are indicators of improved morale and improved citizen satisfaction for NOPD.


Established the Superintendent’s Youth Advisory Council made up of high school seniors from across Orleans Parish, and established the Superintendent’s Faith Advisory Council, made up of all major denominations of religious leaders in Orleans Parish. Both groups provide for direct communication of the views of the broader youth and faith communities to the Superintendent’s office which are vital to updating community policing strategies and policies.


In 2015, refocused the efforts of the Compliance Bureau to jump start progress and reset the relationship with the Consent Decree Monitor Team and the Federal Judge overseeing the case so that NOPD can achieve compliance with the 492 paragraphs of the Consent Decree. As a result, based on NOPD’s internal assessments, the department went from 16% of paragraphs in compliance in February 2016, to 73% complaint in February 2018. As of January 2019, the NOPD’s self-assessment is above 90% of paragraphs compliance and is on track to achieving overall substantial compliance by the end of 2019.


Provided support to over 20 jurisdictions and organizations since 2014 that sought out NOPD to learn from departmental successes and adopt NOPD practices in policing, data driven management, reform management, officer peer intervention, staffing a compliance or reform unit, crime analytics, use of force review boards, and force investigation teams.


Oversaw the deployment of new systems and processes to intervene with officers before disciplinary actions are required, including the Early Intervention System, Insight, which tracks 18 separate measurements to ensure officer behavior is consistent with departmental standards. In 2016, launched the Ethical Policing is Courageous (EPIC) program, an officer-led and managed program that empowers officers to check in with each other, regardless of rank, to raise the standard of ethical behavior across the department. Both Insight and EPIC have received national recognition for being forward-leaning and in line with the latest in best practices for improved community relations, better officer retention, and excellence in law enforcement personnel management.
Deployed the Management Analytics for eXcellence (MAX) program which revolutionized the outdated COMSTAT model that only tracked crime statistics. The MAX program monitors over a dozen management criteria, including calls for service, clearance rates, personnel data, public integrity complaints, vehicle crash data, compliance audit data, response time, and community policing initiatives. MAX has now become a model for best practices in management of policing efforts for major cities.


Integrated technological improvements into NOPD operations to maximize police personnel resources and reduce administrative burdens on officers; including launching the false alarm reduction program in May 2017 resulting in a 40% reduction in false alarm calls; the deployment of the NOPD Online Reporting system to handle non-emergency, property related crimes that only require a police report for insurance purposes; the procurement of 500+ new computers for officers to use the Electronic Police Report & Field Interview Card system; and the installation of License Plate Readers in 46 locations to assist in investigative efforts across the City of New Orleans. 

COMMANDER, SEVENTH DISTRICT JANUARY 2012 – AUGUST 2014
Oversaw a reduction in violent crime in the 7th District for two consecutive years while serving as the Commander (2012 & 2013).


Served as principal manager of all police services to residents, businesses, and visitors of the 7th Police District, including management of patrols for calls for service, proactive efforts to increase police visibility, criminal investigations of violent crimes against persons and property, narcotics enforcement, street crimes, gang-involved criminal activity, and community engagement efforts.


Oversaw the practical application of a variety of criminal justice research approaches along with a wide range of interpretations from analytical data gathered for crime mapping in the 7th District.


Community surveys performed in the 7th District during this time showed improved citizen satisfaction of NOPD and improved views on quality of life and police interactions.


Co-authored the language for HB #1158 (2014) (passed and became R.S. 14:107.5) dealing with the solicitation of funds or transportation for certain unlawful purposes.

COMMANDER, SPECIAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION JANUARY 2011 – JANUARY 2012
Served as principal manager of all administrative functions of narcotics, vice, organized and unorganized gang enforcement units within NOPD.


Managed criminal intelligence gathering and investigative efforts throughout the City of New Orleans and served as the first NOPD Commander to coordinate with the regional Criminal Intelligence Center (CIC) in Jefferson Parish, which provides support for NOPD, Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office, Louisiana State Police, the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office, Gretna Police Department, and Kenner Police Department.


Acted as NOPD liaison to all federal and state agencies participating in inter-agency investigations as MOU partners, including the FBI, DEA, ATF, US Marshalls, LA State Police, and the ATC.

LIEUTENANT, PUBLIC INTEGRITY BUREAU AUGUST 2010 – JANUARY 2011 AND MARCH 2006 – JANUARY 2009
Supervised covert and ongoing investigations into criminal and administrative allegations against members of the NOPD.


Provided recommendations for discipline of officers through training and/or penalty and reviewed police actions and disciplinary measures to assist in improving policies and procedures.


Acted as Liaison to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Public Corruption Unit.

LIEUTENANT, ASSISTANT DISTRICT COMMANDER, SEVENTH DISTRICT JANUARY 2009 – AUGUST 2010
Coordinated all administrative functions for the district, including: analysis and implementation of patrol strategies, coordination of major event operational plans, ensuring all officers are completing in-service training, and assigning/monitoring district level disciplinary investigation.


Acted as Liaison to the NOPD Training Academy, City Attorney’s office, and District Attorney’s Offices on matters related to 7th District operations.

SERGEANT, PUBLIC INTEGRITY BUREAU JUNE 2000 – MARCH 2006
Participated in covert investigations into criminal and administrative allegations involving members of the NOPD.


Provided testimony on the conduct of officers discovered in the course of investigations into police misconduct.

SERGEANT, EIGHTH DISTRICT (EVENING WATCH) JUNE 1999 – JUNE 2000
Supervised, trained, coached, directed, and disciplined patrol officers assigned to the 8th District Evening Watch.


Analyzed crime trends and operationalized deployment strategies for the platoon.


Coordinated enforcement strategies with citizen groups, area businesses, and community leaders in the 8th District.


Prepared statistical data on crime trends in the 8th District and presented data to Command Staff.


Performed administrative functions for the platoon to ensure compliance with departmental policies on training and supervision.

DETECTIVE, MAJOR CASE NARCOTICS SECTION FEBRUARY 1995 – JUNE 1999
Conducted historical criminal investigations and participated in undercover operations related to street level, mid-level, wholesale, and retail narcotics trafficking throughout the City of New Orleans.


Participated in multi-jurisdictional investigations with local, state, and federal agencies.

TASK FORCE OFFICER, SIXTH DISTRICT MARCH 1992 – FEBRUARY 1995
Actively patrolled and responded to citizen calls for service.


Targeted street level retail narcotics traffickers and violent offenders.


Responded to crime trends and participated in directed patrols and task force operations.

PATROL OFFICER, SIXTH DISTRICT (EVENING WATCH) OCTOBER 1991 – MARCH 1992
Conducted traffic enforcement and responded to citizen calls for service.

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING:

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
NATIONAL EXECUTIVE INSTITUTE (NEI), CLASS #40 SEPTEMBER 2017
Topical areas selected for the program included: national and international political, economic, and social trends affecting the policing function; ethics and integrity; the effects of affirmative action on hiring and promotional policies; media relations; labor relations; the future structure of police organizations; financing of police operations; training and legal issues; labor relations; and the impact of criminal activity on policing.

POLICE EXECUTIVE RESEARCH FORUM
SENIOR MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE FOR POLICE (SMIP) JUNE 2014
SMIP provides senior police executives with intensive training in the latest management concepts and practices used in business and government. It also features discussions of the most challenging issues facing law enforcement executives today.

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE (IACP)
LEADERSHIP IN POLICE ORGANIZATIONS (LPO) PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2013
IACP’s flagship leadership development training program, the LPO is modeled after the training concept of dispersed leadership (“every officer a leader”) and delivers modern behavioral science concepts and theories uniquely tailored to the law enforcement environment.

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR PUBLIC SAFETY
SCHOOL OF POLICE STAFF AND COMMAND, CLASS #288 AUGUST 2009 – OCTOBER 2009
An intensive ten-week program that prepares law enforcement managers for senior positions by uniquely combining academic principles with practical applications.

AFFILIATIONS:
Elected to the Board of Directors of the Major Cities Chiefs Association in 2017 to represent the interests of 19 Major Cities located in the Central Region of North America
Active membership in the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
Active membership in the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF)
Active membership in the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement (NOBLE) Executives
Active member of the National Law Enforcement Immigration Task Force
Ordained Minister and former overseer of ministry operations at City of Love Church, New Orleans


TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX, NEW ORLEANS CAMPUS APRIL 2010 – AUGUST 2014 FACULTY/INSTRUCTOR
Provided instruction to students in the following course work: Contemporary Issues and Futures in Criminal Justice, Organizational Behavior and Management, Criminal Justice Management Theory and Practice, Managing Criminal Justice Personnel, Juvenile Justice Systems and processes, Current Issues/Futures in Criminal Justice Management, Forecasting and Strategic Planning, Criminology, Research Methods, Criminal Law, Policing
Ethics, Organized Crime.

MAJOR CITIES CHIEFS ASSOCIATION OCTOBER 2017 - PRESENT
POLICE EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE (PELI) MENTOR
PELI is designed to develop current and future law enforcement leaders and to ready them for the transition to the highest leadership position within an agency. The program consists of five components including and mentor shadowing day with an executive level Chief, Sheriff, or Superintendent. In October 2017, provided mentor shadowing to the Deputy Chief of Kansas City, MO Police Department. Presently assigned to serve as a mentor to an assistant
chief of the Nashville Police Department.

NOPD POLICE ACADEMY SEPTEMBER 2013 – AUGUST 2014 INSTRUCTOR
Provided instruction to NOPD personnel on the topic of Leadership in Police Organizations based on the training principles learned while enrolled in the IACP LPO Program.

MILITARY EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION:

LOUISIANA AIR NATIONAL GUARD APRIL 1987 – APRIL 1995
MUNITIONS SYSTEMS SPECIALIST HONORABLE DISCHARGE

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY, NEW ORLEANS, LA GRADUATED MAY 2008
MASTERS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE


UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX, NEW ORLEANS CAMPUS GRADUATED MAY 2006
BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE


MCDONOGH 35 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATED 1987

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Office of
Mayor Catherine E. Pugh

Eric Brown
Office of Neighborhoods
100 N. Holliday Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
ericl.brown@baltimorecity.gov
410-545-1858 (Office)