MD HBCU LAWSUIT TALKING POINTS

MD HBCU LAWSUIT TALKING POINTS

MD HBCU LAWSUIT TALKING POINTS

  • In 2006 a coalition of students, alumni, and supporters of HBCUs filed a lawsuit against the state of Maryland alleging that Maryland had violated the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Fordice Decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in duplicating the academic programs of Coppin State University, Morgan State University, University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Bowie State University at nearby predominantly white institutions.
  • In October 2013 Maryland Federal Court Judge Catherine Blake ruled in favor of the HBCUs, stating that the state of Maryland continues to operate a segregated and unconstitutional system of higher education to the detriment of Historically Black Institutions.
  • Further the judge ruled in November 2017 that bringing the system into compliance with the law requires the State to establish a set of unique and high demand programs to form niches or specialty areas; to cease and desist from  the practice of unnecessary program duplication; and to work with a special master to identify the program niches to be established at each institutions and the associated costs. The state of Maryland chose to challenge Judge Blake’s decision and appealed the case to the United States Court of Appeals.
  • In addition, Governor Larry Hogan proposed in March 2018, to settle the case for only $100 million over a 10-year period or an annual supplement of $2.5 million dollars per HBI.
  • In 2001, Mississippi settled a similar case for three HBCUs (Jackson State University, Alcorn State University and Mississippi Valley State University) for $500 million which amounts to $850 million in today’s dollars.  When adjusted to include a fourth campus, it would be in excess of $1 billion. It is important to note that Judge Blake indicated in her ruling that the duplication in Maryland was more pervasive than it was in Mississippi.  Also, experts for the state had estimated the plan proposed by the HBI Coalition to cost $1-2 billion and the governor’s offer was only one tenth of the lower end of that estimate.

.

   





.

 

.